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“Should there be punishment for spoiling a natural beauty spot?”

Times Echo and Life / All News / “Should there be punishment for spoiling a natural beauty spot?”
13 days, 4 hours agoNo Comments.
4 AUG

“Should there be punishment for spoiling a natural beauty spot?”

By timesecholife on in All News, Leek news

A Moorlands woman is calling upon fellow public open space visitors to clear up after themselves. Teresa Pattison, who lives in Leek, is calling on people to not leave litter behind after enjoying the many scenic spots across the Moorlands.

A Moorlands woman is calling upon fellow public open space visitors to clear up after themselves.

Teresa Pattison, who lives in Leek, is calling on people to not leave litter behind after enjoying the many scenic spots across the Moorlands.

After visiting Rudyard Lake to take her two pooches for a walk and a swim recently, Teresa said: “A heart-breaking mess left all over Rudyard last night.

I spent over an hour clearing broken bottles, plastic waste, large, broken, plastic carrying boxes, barbecue trays and waste, food, socks, pants and a towel all scattered over the ‘beach’ side areas of Rudyard.

An unbelievable amount of litter left last night by groups of teenagers.

My main concern is that dogs will be injured and have paws cut by all the smashed glass.

Parents, please talk to your teenagers about respect and litter.”

Teresa continued: “Since then, I have talked to other visitors at Rudyard who have also done the same and cleared up after others including moving many broken bottles.

Having given this some considerable thought since, I am left with the dilemma of what if anything I can do, or we all as a society can do?

Should there be a punishment for those who would so wilfully smash and spoil a natural beauty spot we are all lucky enough to have so close by.

Would a punishment change a mindset that thinks this sort of behaviour is okay? Or does that just satisfy a punitive instinct?

Japan used to have a zero tolerance to vandals and police would visit their homes and smash up their bedrooms – a drastic measure but I doubt there was a repeat of such careless and destructive behaviour.

Or, could we seek to engage and change the attitudes of those who are so set on leaving their rubbish for others to clear up? Would appointing teenage ambassadors to be a positive influence help?

These questions have been rumbling around my brain for over a week.”

Teresa added: “Since then, I have seen a similar scenario at Brough Park where a group had taken large blue carpet tiles, had a picnic and left all their rubbish under the trees by the lake and even emptied polystyrene cups into the lake.

Not all young people have this callous disregard for dogs or for ducks either so is it a problem with parenting?

Should parents be held responsible if their child leaves a trail of trash?

We see the same attitude in the aftermath of festivals where teams are employed to clear up after party goers so it’s not just teenagers.

Is it laziness? Disregard and disconnect with nature? Lack of awareness or lack of education about the country code – leave nothing but footsteps.”

What do you think the solution is? Email your thoughts to news@timesandecho.co.uk.

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