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Red light for development as it “encroaches on the countryside”

Times Echo and Life / All News / Red light for development as it “encroaches on the countryside”
2 months, 22 days agoNo Comments.
14 MAY

Red light for development as it “encroaches on the countryside”

By timesecholife on in All News, Featured News

Planners have refused to rubber-stamp retrospective plans for an access track and parking at a farm in the Moorlands. Officers at Staffordshire Moorlands District Council (SMDC), rejected the application for the planning permission in Cresswell under delegated powers.

Planners have refused to rubber-stamp retrospective plans for an access track and parking at a farm in the Moorlands.

Officers at Staffordshire Moorlands District Council (SMDC), rejected the application for the planning permission in Cresswell under delegated powers.

Mr and Mrs Swinnerton submitted the retrospective application for the access track and parking from Cresswell Old Road at Isaac Walton Farm in Cresswell Road.

Currently access to the farm is via Cresswell Road – and that access point has been included as part of permission to convert an out-building on the farm.

The newly-built track gives them access from the less frequently used Cresswell Old Road and opens out to providing parking for several vehicles.

One of the main issues raised by planning officers was the impact on the Green Belt and the character and appearance of the area.

In a report outlining the reasons for refusing permission for the new access road and parking area, officers said: “The new car park in particular now occupies a significant area of what was field that provided important openness between Isaac Walton Farm and the public house property.

The man-made, constructed surface now covers an area where grass naturally grew and the vehicles which stand for prolonged and frequent periods are structures of significant size that, rather than preserve, obstruct and consume the openness of the Green Belt.

The farmhouse has an existing vehicular access direct onto the Cresswell Road, but the applicants find this a difficult entrance to utilise, given the speed and frequency of oncoming traffic along the Cresswell Road.

They consider the new access onto Old Cresswell Road to be safer. It does appear that the Old Road is noticeably quieter and less used, however, this does not explain the introduction of the new parking area, parking could have been retained within the dwelling’s curtilage with a new access arrangement.

The access onto Cresswell Lane at the front is not in any way uniquely dangerous it has served the property throughout its life and indeed planning permission has just been granted for a second dwelling to share the access with the conversion of the applicant’s coach house.

Overall, this is not a consideration that clearly outweighs the substantial weight that is attributed to the Green Belt harm and it does not amount to a very special circumstance.”

In rejecting the application, officers said in a letter confirming the decision: “Specifically the development encroaches on the countryside beyond the curtilage of existing development by making an addition to and exacerbating the urbanising impact and form of existing built development that lies in the Green Belt between neighbouring towns.

The development is therefore, inappropriate and, by definition, harmful to the Green Belt. There are no considerations that clearly outweigh that harm to the Green Belt.”

The couple have 12 weeks from the date of the decision to launch an appeal.

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