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POLICE RESCUE DISTRESSED DOG FROM HOT CAR

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31 MAY

POLICE RESCUE DISTRESSED DOG FROM HOT CAR

By timesecholife on in Latest News

Pet locked in car in searing 26°C heat

WHILE many of us were basking in the first  heatwave of the year, officers from Staffordshire Police were called in to answer reports of a distressed dog locked in a hot car.
With temperatures in Cheadle peaking at around 26°C on Friday 26th May shoppers in Cheadle were horrified on noticing a small dog which had been locked in a car parked in the Tape Street car park.
Concerned members of the public raised the alarm with local police on patrol nearby.
Speaking about the incident PC Dave Stubbs commented: “It was 26 degrees and the dog was not only left in the car but also a dog box.
“I was able to enter the vehicle and rescue the dog which was in some distress but thankfully after being given water and allowed to cool down it recovered quickly with no lasting effects.
“The owners of the dog returned to the car whilst we were there and the 94-year-old male owner of the dog from Forsbrook has been reported to the RSPCA for consideration of what action to take.”
Readers are advised to never leave a dog alone in a car on a warm day. If you see a dog in distress in a hot car, dial 999.
PC Stubbs added: “Many people still believe that it’s ok to leave a dog in a car on a warm day if the windows are left open or they’re parked in the shade, but the truth is, it’s still a very dangerous situation for the dog.
“A car can become as hot as an oven very quickly, even when it doesn’t feel that warm. When it’s 22 degrees, in a car it can reach an unbearable 47 degrees within the hour.”
Police are frequently asked what to do on discovering a dog in a vehicle that appears hot and distressed.
The answer depends on the level of distress.  It is not advisable to force entry to the vehicle yourself in the first instance.
If the police don’t have time to get there, then you have to decide if you should take action. Make sure you tell the police what you intend to do, why and, where possible, take images/footage of the dog and the names and numbers of witnesses to the incident.
Remember, do not force entry unless you are certain of your grounds and are prepared to defend your actions at court in the unlikely event any action was taken.
The RSPCA can offer guidance on information on cruelty via their cruelty line at any time on 0300 1234 999. See further advice from the RSPCA on the website in related information.

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