Magazine Background Image

“Mandy was a beautiful person”

Times Echo and Life / All News / “Mandy was a beautiful person”
1 month, 6 days agoNo Comments.
24 SEP

“Mandy was a beautiful person”

By timesecholife on in All News, Featured News

Donations made in memory of a treasured wife and mother will fund research into Motor Neurone Disease (MND) in hopes of one day, finding a cure. Mandy Cope sadly passed away earlier this year just 13 months after receiving the devastating diagnosis that she had MND. She was just 56 when she died on January 28.

Donations made in memory of a treasured wife and mother will fund research into Motor Neurone Disease (MND) in hopes of one day, finding a cure.

Mandy Cope sadly passed away earlier this year just 13 months after receiving the devastating diagnosis that she had MND. She was just 56 when she died on January 28.

Donations collected at her funeral and a further £550 given in her memory by Mark Deaville and organisers of The Anchor Fruit and Veg Show, have been donated to the Motor Neurone Disease Association.

Mandy’s husband, Kevin, said £1,525 had been given to fund research and that the many people who donated and who attended her funeral on Valentine’s Day, had been a great comfort to him and their daughters Kimberley, 33 and Natalie, 26.

Kevin said: “I’ve had so many calls from people, it has been a comfort. But we’re missing her so much. It’s terrible. It’s been hard, especially for the girls. They miss their mum.

It’s very hard. I was always putting my arms around her or holding her – I couldn’t help it. We met at the British Legion club in 1981. I knew I liked her straight away but she was going out with someone else. When that finished I asked her out and we got married in 1982 at Leek Registry Office.”


The couple lived with Kevin’s parents after their marriage and later brought up their children at their home in Attlee Road. They enjoyed coach trips across the UK, particularly Scotland and the Western Isles, as well as hotel trips to the seaside with their dogs.

Three years ago, they recreated their first holiday together in Paignton, retracing the steps they had first taken as a new couple in 1981.

Mandy worked at TSB in Meir in the early 80s and provided cover at different branches in the area before settling at the Cheadle office for several years. She took several part time jobs while her daughters were young and later moved to work at the Stunner as a receptionist.

Editor at the newspaper, Paul Campbell said: “Mandy was a beautiful person – a really nice woman. She wasn’t an employee, but a colleague and a friend who thought of everybody else before herself.”

A few years ago, Mandy moved on from the Stunner, taking a receptionist position at the Tardis Surgery.

Dr Kevin Upton and Dr Simranjett Kaur at the Tardis said: “Mandy was a wonderful person who is always in our hearts and is greatly missed by everyone.

Mandy was the most calm and composed team member we have ever had, and we hope she is resting in peace.”

Mandy also became known as a singer in the area, thanks to Kevin’s karaoke. Kevin said: “I just do karaoke as a hobby and would go to pubs in the area now and then for charity events and things like that. After a while Mandy would join in with the singing – she had a great voice, she could sing brilliantly.

It was one night at The Swan at Town End I noticed something wrong with her voice. She kept clearing her throat and coughing.”

The issues with Mandy’s voice were the first sign something was wrong. After a series of tests, the family were given the devastating diagnosis that Mandy had Motor Neurone Disease.

MND affects everyone differently, but starts when the motor neurones in the brain gradually stop reaching the muscles, making them weak, stiff and start to waste away.

Kevin said: “Some people have MND and they live with symptoms for a long time. For Mandy it was rapidly progressing.

I cared for her. Med Equip were brilliant, they sorted out the equipment for us, so I could get her into the bath. I wouldn’t let anyone else do that, if I was a millionaire I wouldn’t have let anyone else lift her and wash her.

I’d let her soak for a little while and I’d sing her two or three songs on the karaoke before bathing her and washing her hair.

If she’d stayed like that we would’ve managed. I’d have looked after her. But she deteriorated quickly and eventually I couldn’t lift her anymore.

She suffered for 13 months and then she died. I don’t think many people know about MND or how awful it can be. We want people to understand how terrible it can be and hope that one day, they will find a cure.

It was comforting that so many people loved her. She loved the people we met doing karaoke and the people she worked with – she was close friends with Julie Bull and always talked about her friends at the Stunner.

When she moved to the Tardis she made new friends there and when I retired I said she should finish work too, but she wouldn’t because there were two people unable to work and she didn’t want to let them down. That’s the kind of woman she was.

We all miss her. Her daughters, our granddaughter Olivia, her sister Lynne and her niece Alethea. It’s been terrible for us all.

Mandy was just lovely. I adored her.”

For more information about MND, visit: www.mndassociation.org.

Share this post:

ADD A COMMENT

Comments will appear once approved by our administrators, your email address will not be displayed.

timesecholife -

Pre Footer 2 571×105 (Left)
Pre Footer 1 571×105 (Right)

Web Design Company