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Dangers of weed that causes burns

Times Echo and Life / All News / Dangers of weed that causes burns
1 month, 9 days agoNo Comments.
30 JUN

Dangers of weed that causes burns

By timesecholife on in All News, Leek news

The mother of a young boy who has been burned – allegedly by a weed – is raising awareness of the dangers of the plant. It is suspected that Kimberley Walker’s son, 12-year-old son Thomas, was burnt on his hands and face by Giant Hogweed in Leek.

The mother of a young boy who has been burned – allegedly by a weed – is raising awareness of the dangers of the plant.

It is suspected that Kimberley Walker’s son, 12-year-old son Thomas, was burnt on his hands and face by Giant Hogweed in Leek.

The plant is a highly dangerous plant as the sap is toxic and can cause significant blistering and scaring of the skin.

Kimberley told the Leek & Moorlands Echo that Thomas had been playing football at the time of the incident and that the ball had gone into some undergrowth which Thomas retrieved but came out

with burns on his hands a face.

Kimberley said: “When he came home to us on the Thursday, he told us he put his hands into nettles but it looked worse than that, so we took him to A&E and they treated it for us and put dressing on for us.

Then on the Friday morning, he woke up with a burn on his cheek, he didn’t even know it was there at first.

I put a plaster on it and sent him to school, and then the school rang me to say that the burn has spread down to his jaw.

We had a telephone consultation with the doctors.

The doctors gave us some cream to put on the burns but then rang us later on the Friday night and told us that he had booked us in with a plastic surgeon.

So we’ve been to go to the Royal Stoke this week and we now understand that it could leave scarring on his face.

So, we’ve got special ointment to put on the burns and we have to keep him covered and away from direct sunlight.

The burns have managed to spread under his eyes, and it also effects the pigmentation of his skin, so now he has three burns on one side of his face.

Skin is starting to form now but it’s scarred his hand and that’s six weeks on.”

 

Wanting to raise awareness about the dangerous plant, Kimberley said: “It’s hard to identify, as there is common hogweed and giant hogweed, but even then you still need to be careful around the common hogweed as it can still be very dangerous.”

The Times & Echo contacted the Staffordshire Moorlands District Council as it offers advice about the weed on their website.

The spokesperson said the council could not comment on the circumstances around this incident which occurred on land not in its control.

They added: “All landowners have a responsibility to control invasive species such as giant hogweed and we would advise Ms Walker to report this incident to them so they can take appropriate action.

There is information on the council’s website about giant hogweed, and other harmful weeds and non-native plants, which includes advice on how to identify plants and how to report it to the relevant authority if you come across these plants.”

The Leek & Moorlands Echo has been informed of the location in Leek where, it is believed, Thomas came into contact with Giant Hogweed, but we have decided to omit the location in our report due to the landowners stating that they have investigated and, they believe, no such weed is on their site.

For further information about Giant Hogweed go online to: https://www.staffsmoorlands.gov.uk/article/2541/Harmful-weeds-and-non-native-plants.

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